One of the first things I did upon moving to Copenhagen was to order a raincoat

One of the first things I did upon moving to Copenhagen was to order a raincoat. More than one person had informed me that Danes didn’t believe in bad weather, just bad clothing, and I was determined to assimilate this piece of local wisdom.

Danes today tend to think of Swedes as uptight metrosexuals; Swedes see their neighbors across the Oresund as jaywalking, pot-smoking anarchists; and both agree that Norwegians are dull, backwoods hicks with an annoying amount of oil wealth.

Gradually, the quirks and the knowledge cohere into an argument that makes sense of all that melancholy: In small, homogeneous nations governed by a rigid social conformity, it takes a particularly extreme temperament to stand out. “Considerable personal courage and ethical conviction are required,” he writes, “if such voices are to survive disapproval long enough for people to start listening to what they have to say.”

more here.

Extra : What makes it even more interesting is that neither the Swedes nor Danes can understand each other’s language so they prefer to communicate in a neutral language, English. Meanwhile, both (without admitting it) in some way envy their happy-go-lucky neighbours, the Norwegians, who can understand both Danish and Swedish. here.

hey there fella,

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